Abstract

BACKGROUND: Premorbid conditions influence the outcome of acutely ill adult patients aged 80 years and over who are admitted to the ICU. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of such premorbid conditions on 6 month survival.

METHODS: Prospective cohort study in 242 ICUs from 22 countries including patients 80 years or above, admitted over a 6 months period to an ICU between May 2018 and May 2019. Only emergency (acute) ICU admissions in adult patients ≥ 80 years of age were eligible. Patients who were admitted after planned/elective surgery were excluded. We measured the Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS), the Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly (IQCODE), disability with the Katz activities of daily living (ADL) score, comorbidities and a Polypharmacy Score (CPS).

RESULTS: Overall, the VIP2 study included 3920 patients. During ICU stay 1191 patients died (30.9%), and another 436 patients (11.1%) died after ICU discharge but within the first 30 days of admission, and an additional 895 patients died hereafter but within the first 6 months after admission (22.8%). The 6 months mortality was 64%. The median CFS was 4 (IQR 3-6). Frailty (CFS ≥ 5) was present in 26.6%. Cognitive decline (IQCODE above 3.5) was found in 30.2%. The median IQCODE was 3.19. A Katz ADL of 4 or less was present in 27.7%. Patients who surviving > 6 months were slightly younger (median age survivors 84 with IQR 81-86) than patients dying within the first 6 months (median age 84, IQR 82-87, p = 0.013), were less frequently frail (CFS > 5 in 19% versus 34%, p < 0.01) and were less dependent based on their Katz activities of daily living measurement (median Katz score 6, IQR 5-6 versus 6 points, IQR 3-6, p < 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS: We found that Clinical Frailty Scale, age, and SOFA at admission were independent prognostic factors for 6 month mortality after ICU admission in patients age 80 and above. Adding other geriatric syndromes and scores did not improve the model. This information can be used in shared-decision making.

CLINICALTRIALS: gov: NCT03370692.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAnnals of Intensive Care
Volume14
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)46
ISSN2110-5820
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30.03.2024
Externally publishedYes

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