Entzündliche Dermatosen auf pigmentierter Haut

Translated title of the contribution: Inflammatory dermatoses in skin of color

Ralf J. Ludwig*, Esther von Stebut

*Corresponding author for this work
2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Acne, rosacea, atopic dermatitis, and psoriasis vulgaris are common inflammatory dermatoses. Of note, the epidemiology and clinical presentation of these common dermatologic diseases varies considerably between people with different colors of skin. Yet, most dermatology textbooks present and describe the clinical pictures of White people. To provide excellent dermatological care for all patients, it is of central importance to know the epidemiology and recognize key clinical characteristics of these diseases in patients with skin of color (SOC). In acne, cultural habits of Blacks (use of steroid-based lighteners, comedogenic hair care products) may lead to manifestation of specific forms of acne. In addition, postinflammatory hyperpigmentation and keloids pose particular therapeutic challenges in this patient group. Atopic dermatitis in Asians shows a clinical and histological picture that is similar to psoriasis in Whites. By contrast, atopic dermatitis manifests on the extensor side in Black people. Due to the difficulty of recognizing erythema in SOC, the severity of the respective inflammatory diseases in these individuals is often underestimated. The treatment of acne, rosacea, atopic dermatitis, and psoriasis does not differ between people of different skin colors. The exception is the necessary therapy for postinflammatory hyperpigmentation in all the inflammatory dermatoses mentioned, and for keloids in acne.

Translated title of the contributionInflammatory dermatoses in skin of color
Original languageGerman
JournalDermatologie
Volume74
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)84-89
Number of pages6
ISSN2731-7005
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 02.2023

Research Areas and Centers

  • Academic Focus: Center for Infection and Inflammation Research (ZIEL)
  • Centers: Center for Research on Inflammation of the Skin (CRIS)

DFG Research Classification Scheme

  • 204-05 Immunology
  • 205-19 Dermatology

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