Subjective need for psychological support (PsySupp) in parents of children and adolescents with disorders of sex development (dsd)

Elena Bennecke*, Knut Werner-Rosen, Ute Thyen, Eva Kleinemeier, Anke Lux, Martina Jürgensen, Annette Grüters, Birgit Köhler

*Korrespondierende/r Autor/-in für diese Arbeit
10 Zitate (Scopus)

Abstract

Disorders/diversity of sex development (dsd) is an umbrella term for congenital conditions often diagnosed within childhood. As most parents are unprepared for this situation, psychological support (PsySupp) is recommended. The aim of this study was to analyse the extent to which parents express a need for PsySupp. Three hundred twenty-nine parents of children with dsd were included; 40.4 % of the parents indicated to have a need for PsySupp, only 50 % of this group received it adequately. The diagnoses partial gonadal dysgenesis, partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (pAIS) and disorders of androgen synthesis are associated with a high need for PsySupp in parents (54, 65, and 50 %). Sex assignment surgery neither reduced nor increased the need for PsySupp. Taking a picture, radiography, laparoscopy, gonadal biopsy, gonadectomy and hormonal puberty induction are associated with a high need for PsySupp. There was no association between the need for PsySupp and the parents’ perception of the appearance of the genitalia. Conclusion: Having a child with dsd is associated with a high need for PsySupp in parents. In particular, parents of children with XY-dsd with androgen effects other than hypospadias expressed a high need of PsySupp. PsySupp for parents should be an obligatory part of interdisciplinary care to reduce fears and concerns.

OriginalspracheEnglisch
ZeitschriftEuropean Journal of Pediatrics
Jahrgang174
Ausgabenummer10
Seiten (von - bis)1287-1297
Seitenumfang11
ISSN0340-6199
DOIs
PublikationsstatusVeröffentlicht - 26.10.2015

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